New Microchip Can Mimic How a Human Brain Thinks

New Microchip Can Mimic How a Human Brain Thinks

susanne_posel_news_ brain.chip.gridsSusanne Posel
Occupy Corporatism
August 1, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers from the University of Zurich, have created neuromorphic chips that can mimic the way a human brain will process information in real-time.

With the assistance of an artificial sensory processing system, these chips are able to display cognitive abilities.

Giacomo Indiveri, professor at the Institute of Neuroinformatics (INI), of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, explained that the goal of the team was to “emulate the properties of biological neurons and synapses directly on microchips.”

With the creation of artificial neuromorphic neurons that can perform specified tasks, the researchers are able to further advancement toward a complex sensorimotor that can complete tasks in real-time.

Shockingly, behavior can be replicated by input formulated in a finite-state machine that could be transferred into neuromorphic hardware.

Indiveri stated: “The network connectivity patterns closely resemble structures that are also found in mammalian brains.”

Researchers at the University of Berkley have suggested implanting mind-reading “neural dust” into human brains to facilitate connectivity of man to machine.

If this dust were sprinkled onto a human brain, it could form an “implantable neural interface system that remains viable for a lifetime.”

This dust would consist of particles no more than 100 micrometers across that would be millions of sensors capable of measuring electrical activity in neutrons within the brain.

According to the paper, these sensors could be attached to the “tips of fine wire arrays” that could be inserted directly into brain tissue.

This would enable a human brain – machine interface and create a mechanical “telepathy”.

Another way scientists are endeavoring to connect man to machine is through the use of newly developed stretchy conductive material that could be attached to electrode implants to the brain or pacemakers.

This gold-crafted nanoparticle invention is an elastic polymer that can be stretched to four times its original length.

Nicholas Kotov, chemical engineer at the University of Michigan (UoM) explains that “it looks like elastic gold. But we can stretch it just like a rubber band. And when you release the stress, they pretty much come back to their original position.”

Kotov claims that this invention “can alleviate a lot of diseases-for instance, severe depression, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. They can serve as a part of artificial limbs and other prosthetic devices controlled by brain.”

The Royal Society, in conjunction with Academy of Medical Sciences, British Academy and Royal Academy of Engineering came together this month to discuss the potentials, opportunities and challenges of the melding of man with machine (i.e. transhumanism) under the guise of augmentation technologies.

At the Human Enhancement and the Future of Work conference, and further expanded upon in their published report, explains how science and ethics are coming into conflict as technology promises to replace the faulty human body with an eternal, mechanical replacement.

These transhumanists define human enhancement as everything that “encompasses a range of approaches that may be used to improve aspects of human function (e.g. memory, hearing, mobility). This may either be for the purpose of restoring an impaired function to previous or average levels, or to raise function to a level considered to be ‘beyond the norm’ for humans.” Many transhumanist groups can be found throughout the world, such as the UK Transhumanist Association who believes that scientific research must be applied to answer questions of the human condition and bring substantial benefit to society. The Oxford Transhumanists promote “radical life extension, artificial intelligence, cognitive enhancement, existential risks and mind – uploading.”

The Future of Humanity Institute at the University of Oxford endeavors to answer the “big – picture questions about humanity and its prospects.”

These transhumanists favor the Singularity Summit, an annual extension of the Singularity Institute wherein robotics, artificial intelligence, brain – computer interfacing and [various] emerging technologies” into genetics and regenerative medicine are examined under the perspective of transhumanism.

The transhumanists at the 2045 Program assert that humanity “is in need of a new evolutionary strategy” consisting of a balance between the complexity of technological advances and the acceleration of informational processes to expand the “limited, primitive human” into a “highly self-organized” and technologically “higher intelligence”.

Technology can organize society and integrate unification of a super collective consciousness – a superbeing.

By doing away with individuality, the conclusion is the elimination of:

• Lack of consumer provisions
• Aging, illness and death
• Crime and conflicts
• Natural disasters and catastrophes

The concept of the neo-human and neo-humanity is the replacement for a post-industrial capitalist and consumer-based society where a new form of civilization will emerge.


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