Internet Governance: How 11 Nations Will Control the World Wide Web

Internet Governance: How 11 Nations Will Control the World Wide Web

Orig.src.Susanne.Posel.Daily.News- internet.governance.brazil.state.dept_occupycorporatismSusanne Posel ,Chief Editor Occupy Corporatism | The US Independent
April 23, 2014

 

The US State Department announced that they would “participate in NETmundial – Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance to be held in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 23-24.”

Michael Daniel, cybersecurity coordinator for the White House will accompany representatives from the USSD and the Department of Commerce National Telecommunication and Information Administration (NTIA).

This meeting will combine government and nation representatives to evaluate how society, the private sector, academia and the technical community can come together for the purpose of establishing internet governance.

This meeting is “organized by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (BISC) and 1Net” to collaborate to form a “shared vision for the multistakeholder model of internet governance.”

The Brazilian senate has passed the “Internet Constitution” that provides equal access to the web by all and protects privacy of Brazilian citizens from surveillance operations conducted by organizations such as the National Security Agency (NSA).

Carolina Rossini, co-author of the legislation commented : “I feel my Carnival has finally arrived after years of work in partnership with various civil society, academia, policy makers and business groups that understand the Internet as a space for democracy and innovation! This is a collective victory, nationally and internationally.”

While the part of the legislation that would have forced global internet corporations to store data collected on Brazilian citizens within their own country was omitted from the final bill, Google, Facebook and other tech corporations will be subject to Brazilian laws and courts when monitoring Brazilians; regardless of where in the world that information is stored.

Written into the legislation are provisions to:

• Protect freedom of expression
• Freedom of information
• No liability for service providers on content created by users
• Court orders must be obtained to remove libelous or offensive content
• Limit collection of metadata on Brazilian citizens
• Bars telecom companies from charging high rates for content on streaming video or Skype-like services

Last March, , Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with “creating” the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989 and advisor to the UK government, has called for an internet user’s bill of rights (IUBR) to protect user’s rights and prevent governments and corporate influence.

Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with “creating” the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989 and advisor to the UK government, has called for an internet user’s bill of rights (IUBR) to protect user’s rights and prevent governments and corporate influence.

Berners-Lee said this IUBR would be a Magna Carta of sorts to ensure that the internet remain “accessible to all, from any device, and one that empowers all of us to achieve our dignity, rights and potential as humans.”

On the subject of privacy on the internet, Berners-Lee said: “These issues have crept up on us. Our rights are being infringed more and more on every side, and the danger is that we get used to it. So I want to use the 25th anniversary for us all to do that, to take the web back into our own hands and define the web we want for the next 25 years.”

The Web We Want initiative (WWI), championed by Berners-Lee, endeavors to re-invent the internet with the IUBR in order to establish corroboration for national and regional campaigns to bring the internet to all citizens of every nation.

Berners-Lee explained: “The Web community – and the world at large – are wrestling with tough issues around security, surveillance, privacy, open infrastructure, net neutrality, content protection, and more.”


Tags assigned to this article:
corporationscybersecuritygovernment